What is American Kenpo?

 

Although there is no definitive litmus test for what "is" or "is not" Ed Parker's Kenpo, the basics, techniques, forms, sets, etc. on this site accurately represent the Ed Parker System of Kenpo as outlined in Mr. Parker's five volume book series Infinite Insights into Kenpo as well as his training manuals.

 

The technique Five Swords, by any other name is still five swords.  If one were to change the name back to Five Count, or to Seven Swords, it would only add confusion when a student visited another school.  For this reason, our association stays with the techniques and forms as they were named by Mr. Parker.

 

Mr. Parker worked for many years so that upon his passing we would be left with a set of standard practice manuals to learn from. When the technique names are changed the techniques themselves are changed.  Maybe for the better . . . maybe for the worse, but if you're to change the names of the techniques or the forms, then alter them significantly, should you still call it Ed Parker's Kenpo?

 

 

Kenpo is the system I teach.  If, however, we were to examine my

methods carefully, the system could very easily bear my name.

 

Ed Parker

Black Belt Magazine, July 1979

Basic information for the art of Ed Parker's Kenpo is available through clicking on the links to the left.  Each of these links will, in turn, take you further and further into the fascinating system of Kenpo Karate.

 

Most students and schools already have a curriculum of basics, sets, forms and techniques, so I've spent much of my time adding photos, memorabilia and articles to this site.  If you find a photograph you  like, please feel free to copy it and use it as you wish.  If you would like to use one of the articles, please ask my permission before doing so.

 

I see a lot of web site that say all their images are copyrighted and you'll be prosecuted if you use them without their written permission.  This is very contrary to the type of person Mr. Parker was.  He shared everything he had, giving freely anytime he was asked.

 

I once asked Mr. Parker what I could have, of his, in order to improve my and my students Kenpo.  He responded with. “Anything I have is yours.”  This was Ed Parker and this was his way.  So, if you see any photographs in either my gallery or among the memorabilia that you would like to use, please help yourself.

 

Most of the photographs are my own, but there are also some photographs that were originally taken by others.  Some of these may be copyrighted, I really don't know.  I have found a few on the Internet and others have been sent to me by friends.  If I’ve infringed on anyone else’s rights please let me know and I'll make whatever adjustment may be necessary to my site.

 

On the other hand, if you have any interesting Kenpo memorabilia that you would like to share with rest of the Kenpo family, you’re welcome to send me a high resolution photograph with a description of the item for consideration.